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Convoy operations

Welcome to the this new section of savvysurvivor.com.  This expansion covers areas of interest to the survivor who wants to maintain mobility.

For most of us in the modern society of convenience, our mobility comes from our cars and trucks.  Most people of the survival mindset own trucks and SUVs, while others have cars that are more practical in day to day life.  

Popular survivalist literature and subject matter on Internet sites often points to a survival situation called  a "bug out".  The idea is that a lot of survivors live a day to day life in an environment that is not ideal for surviving hardship.  It is the situation where you hold a job, go to school or own a business, live and maybe raise your kids.

A lot of survivors have a place picked out, if not prepared, for level two and higher situations.  The "retreat" is usually a rural homestead of some type, like a friend or relative's farm or ranch.  The idea being that subsistence living is easier at these places than where you are or would be in a crisis.   Additional reasons for having such a place picked out or prepared would be if the survivor anticipates martial law, either from a government gone bad or a foreign invader.   In such a martial law situation, the government would generally focus control on populated areas and key entry and exit points.  

On the road: Some survivors, either for lack or contacts with rural people or other social and economic reasons, anticipate a quasi-nomadic lifestyle in a crisis.  They want to be relocate where living is easier whenever necessary rather than being tied down to a place.   The RV communities of the Western US are a lot like this.  Populated mostly by "empty nesters" and younger retirees, these communities move among a network of campgrounds and resorts in the Western US.   Summers are spent in the Northwest while winters are spent in the Southwest.   Eventually, a family becomes known among certain networks of communities to the point that many will move to the same places at once.   That way, they maintain a level of social familiarity while only changing the scenery.   For arthritic folks vulnerable to weather changes, the change of locations means that they enjoy a relatively constant climate that is not hostile to their health.  

On the water: Other communities live this way in Europe and take advantage of centuries old river and canal systems and live on houseboats and yachts.  Many of these boats that can be found around the Mediterranean are opulent homes of exiles and expatriates of repressive nations.   They range from criminal drug barons, to royalty and movie stars seeking seclusion from the paparazzi and other parasites who can make the unguarded celebrity's life miserable. 

The boating community spans the globe and unlike the smaller regional RV communities of the North American West, it is common for people to be far more anonymous on the water.  Many of these people like the seclusion the sea has to offer, and the possibilities are endless.  

Bike Mobility: No matter what pattern you follow, your transport in a survival situation is vitally important and you have to take it seriously.  For most of us, that is going to surround our primary motor vehicle, but it is likely in higher threat level scenarios or longer term lower threat level scenarios that you will have to develop alternatives to the car and truck.  For a lot of us, the less than ideal, but practical solution is the bicycle.   For that reason, we have added an entire chapter on bike mobile survival.   As you look at the options, don't think of them all as mutually exclusive.  The bike mobile option is in fact the most compatible with all of the others.  You can  usually carry a bike on your other transport.  

Survival Wheels - An overview of transportation for the survivor