Canteen Cup Cookery - Meals for the field

 

 

This page is dedicated to recopies that were put together for preparation in the field.   The criteria was originally for meals that could be cooked in a standard GI canteen cup, but has expanded a bit to include meals that are best made in a larger pot with servings for more than one person.   The criteria is that the meals need to be nutritious, lightweight and require no refrigeration but do not have a limit on preparation time the way combat rations might.   

 

This is from a post at assaultweb.net (to be edited later)

Here are some recipes from Mrs. Different for field rations. Each recipe is for two people. Steam cook and season the beef and chicken prior to dehydrating. Roast the salmon before dehydrating. The vegetables are dehydrated as well before packaging. Use a food saver to package. The olive oil is sealed in its own plastic packet. Nutritional values obtained from Nutrition Almanac Third Edition by Lavon J. Dunne, 1990.

 

Rice and Pork
2 cups long grain slow cook rice
2 three ounce pork chops
2 cups green beans
1 pork buillion cube
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tea bags
2 multi-vitamin/multi-mineral tablets
2 napkins
pepper and salt

Total calories: 2430 Total protein: 68 grams
Estimated weight: 1.5 to 2 lbs Total cost: $1.80

 

Rice and Beef
2 cups long grain slow cook rice
2 three ounce slices of chuck roast beef
2 cups sliced celery
1 cup sliced mushrooms
1 beef buillion cube
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tea bags
2 multi-vitamin/multi-mineral tablets
2 napkins
salt and pepper

Rice and Fish
2 cups long grain slow cook rice
2 three ounce salmon fillets
2 cups spinach
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 hot coccoa mix
2 multi-vitamin/multi-mineral tablets
2 napkins
salt and pepper

Total calories: 2166 Total protein: 63 grams
Estimated weight: 1.5 to 2 lbs Total Cost: $2.00

Total calories: 2163 Total protein: 61 grams
Estimated weight: 1.5 to 2 lbs Total cost: $1.50

Chicken Stew
2 large potatoes cut into cubes
2 sliced medium carrots
1/2 pound boneless chicken breast
1 chicken buillion cube
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tea bags
2 multi-vitamin/multi-mineral tablets
2 napkins
salt and pepper

Total calories: 668 Total protein: 34 grams
Estimated weight: 1.5 Total cost: $1.50

 

Note, all of these recipes involve preserved meat but can have fresh game meat substituted in.    

Beef (or Bison, Deer, Elk ect) Jerky all starts out about the same way.   Meat is cut into strips and then marinated in a salt and preservative mix before smoking or drying.   This removes water weight and bulk while giving you a longer shelf life for the meat.   The meat will not return to its original bulk when you boil it, but it will retain most of its nutritional value.   Again, serving sizes will be less than comparable fresh meat in order to reduce your chances of salt toxification.   Seal it in plastic if possible in order to preserve it longer. 

Dried and or smoked meat makes a good ingredient in many camp stews, even those which may be "fortified" with other meats.   Meat which has been preserved this way can last in storage a very long time, but over time, it can lose nutritional value.   While Jerky is usually a well liked snack, it can also be difficult for very young and very old people to digest efficiently, thus requiring the person to consume more in order to get the same nutritional value that could be derived from cooking it into a stew.   In either event, you want to take in sufficient water when eating preserved meat, but of course the theory is that boiling the water for the stew will do a bit to kill off parasites that can make you sick.  

Apart from preserved beef and related meats, fish is often usually readily available and fairly easy to preserve in the short term.   Salmon is probably the all time favorite fish for smoking and is a delicacy that many people in the coastal wilderness of the north enjoy as a primary meat source.

All meats preserved in this manner will retain most of their original nutrition and that can be most efficiently recovered when the meats are cooked into a stew.   In either event, it is advised that you consume water when you consume preserved meats but obviously you want to drink more if you are not already boiling the meat to rehydrate it.  

New page on smoking Salmon